Gender Bias Learning Project

A zany brainy look at a serious subject

A project of the Center for WorkLife Law UC Hastings College of the Law

Web-Based Teaching and Training

The Gender Bias Learning website is a rich resource for:

  • Teaching about gender bias patterns,
  • Reviewing knowledge of gender bias patterns, and
  • Teaching strategies for managing gender bias.

Please share your own experiences using the Gender Bias Learning website to teach about gender bias here.

Teaching about Gender Bias Patterns

Watch Videos of Gender Bias Experts Describing Gender Bias Patterns

Viewing the videos of experts describing gender bias patterns can be an effective learning tool. One way to make the activity more interactive is to create five groups of students and assign each group one pattern of gender bias (Prove it Again!, The Maternal Wall, Double Bind, Gender Wars, and the overarching “Double Jeopardy” of race and gender.) Ask each group to view the videos for their assigned pattern and develop a presentation about each pattern for the larger group. To develop their presentation, participants can also use information found on each main pattern page on the Gender Bias Learning website. Each group will then be asked to “teach” about their pattern to the larger group. It is sometimes helpful to offer the participants poster paper, pens, etc. to use if they desire.

Watch Animated Scenarios.

The animated scenarios of each gender bias pattern illustrate the presence of gender bias in the academic workplace. Click here to read how one professor incorporated the scenarios in her “Introduction to Women Studies” Course. Follow these links to the series of scenarios for each gender bias pattern (Prove it Again!, The Maternal Wall, Double Bind, Gender Wars)

Teaching about Gender Bias Patterns

Play Gender Bias Bingo

Playing “Gender Bias Bingo” with a group can teach and review knowledge about the various patterns of gender bias in the workplace.

Take the “Sure I Get It” Pop Quiz

After your group has learned about the main categories of gender bias, a quick and fun way for them to “test” their knowledge is to take the on-line pop quiz. The quiz presents brief scenarios and asks the user to select the gender bias category that best describes each scenario. The “Sure I Get It!” pop quiz is available here.

Develop Gender Bias Scenarios

After your group has learned about the main categories of gender bias, break the larger group into small groups (ideally at least four groups, one for each gender bias pattern: Prove it Again!, The Maternal Wall, Double Bind, Gender Wars). If the group has not previously viewed the scenarios on the Gender Bias Learning website, it may be helpful for each group to watch the series of scenarios for their pattern of gender bias (Prove it Again!, The Maternal Wall, Double Bind, and Gender Wars). Ask each group to develop their own set of scenarios (severe, subtle and no bias) for their assigned pattern. Each group can then share their scenarios with the large group by reading or acting them out.

Teaching Strategies for Managing Gender Bias

Watch Videos of Gender Bias Experts Describing Strategies to Manage Gender Bias

Listening to our Gender Bias Experts discuss strategies for managing gender bias can teach important career management strategies. Click here for ideas on how to teach with the strategy videos found on the Gender Bias Learning website. To share your ideas and experiences in using these videos, click here.

To view the printable games and activities that complement these web-based teaching and training activities, click here.

Although the Gender Bias Learning website was initially developed with the academic workplace in mind, the lessons about gender bias are relevant to any workplace environment. The Center for WorkLife Law is currently working to apply our training program to a broader set of workplace environments.