Gender Bias Learning Project

A zany brainy look at a serious subject

A project of the Center for WorkLife Law UC Hastings College of the Law

Playing Gender Bias Bingo in a Group Setting

There are many ways to play Gender Bias Bingo with a group. Below we outline ideas
for playing Bingo with groups with and without significant workplace experience.

Participants develop examples for Gender Bias Bingo

Watch Videos of Gender Bias Experts Describing Gender Bias Patterns

Note: This version works well for groups of women with professional experience.

  1. Print the gender bias bingo card from the website. A brief glossary of terms is
    on the second page, and if you prefer, a slightly more in-depth
    glossary of terms
    can also be downloaded from the website. Print a copy of the card and glossary (optional)
    for each participant or group of participants.
  2. Ask participants to review the bingo card and the glossary of terms. You may want
    to review them as a group as well.
  3. Ask the participants to write down on a piece of paper one example that illustrates
    a bingo category, excluding identifiable individual and institutional names to the
    extent possible. (If time permits, a participant can share more than one example,
    but each example should be written on a separate piece of paper). Ask the participants
    to only write the example on the paper, not the bingo category that their example
    illustrates. Examples can be from the participant’s experiences or the experiences
    of a colleague or friend.
  4. Collect the anonymous examples, and place them in some container (box, jar, hat,
    etc.).
  5. Ask each participant to pick one example/scenario from the container, read it aloud
    and identify which gender bias category the example illustrates. An example can
    sometimes illustrate more than one category which can result in lively discussion.

Variations: If you anticipate that the participants will be reluctant
to share personal stories, you can ask individuals or small groups to develop fictitious
(but realistic) scenarios that illustrate some of the Gender Bias Bingo categories.
If groups rather than individuals are developing the scenarios, each group can present
their examples and the other groups can identify the appropriate bingo category.

Optional: An optional addition to the game is to ask the group
to brainstorm about strategies for managing each situation after it is correctly
categorized.

Participants use pre-written examples for Gender Bias Bingo

Note: This version works well for groups that do not have significant professional
experience.

  1. Develop examples of each Gender Bias Bingo Category that are relevant to the population
    in your group. Write each example on a separate piece of paper and do not include
    the bingo category that the example illustrates. Fold each piece of paper and place
    it in a container (box, jar, hat, etc.).
  2. Print the gender bias bingo card from the website. A brief glossary of terms is
    on the second page, and if you prefer, a slightly more in-depth
    glossary of terms
    can also be downloaded from the website. Print a copy of the card and glossary (optional)
    for each participant or group of participants.
  3. Ask participants to review the bingo card and the glossary of terms. You may want
    to review them as a group as well.
  4. Ask each participant to pick an example/scenario from the container, read it aloud
    and identify which gender bias category the example illustrates. An example can
    sometimes illustrate more than one category which can result in lively discussion.

Variations: Instead of individuals identifying gender bias categories,
you can break into small groups and have a friendly competition among the groups.

Optional: An optional addition to the game is to ask the group
to brainstorm about strategies for managing each situation after it is correctly
categorized.